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Complete Guide  to Egypt travel & Tours
Complete Egypt

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Complete Egypt

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EGYPT General information

Egypt government

EGYPT: FACTS AND FIGURES

 

Country name:

Conventional long form: Arab republic of Egypt

Conventional short form: Egypt

Local long form: Jumhuriyat Misr Al-Arabiyah

Local short form: Misr

Former: United Arab Republic (with Syria)

 

Government type:

Republic

 

Capital:

Name: Cairo

Geographic coordinates: 30 03 N, 31 15 E

Time difference: UTC+2 (7 hours ahead of Washington, DC during standard time)

 

Administrative divisions:

29 governorates (Muhafazat, singular - Muhafazat); Ad Daqahliyah, Al Bahr Al Ahmar (Red Sea), Al Buhayrah (El Beheira), Al Fayyum (El Fayoum), Al Gharbiyah, Al Iskandariyah (Alexandria), Al Isma'iliyah (Ismailia), Al Jizah (Giza), Al Minufiyah (El Monofia), Al Minya, Al Qahirah (Cairo), Al Qalyubiyah, Al Uqsur (Luxor), Al Wadi Al Jadid (New Valley), As Suways (Suez), Ash Sharqiyah, Aswan, Asyut, Bani Suwayf (Beni Suef), Bur Sa'id (Port Said), Dumyat (Damietta), Helwan, Janub Sina' (South Sinai), Kafr Ash Shaykh, Matruh (Western Desert), Qina (Qena), Shamal Sina' (North Sinai), Sittah Uktubar, Suhaj (Sohag)

 

Independence:

28 February 1922 (from UK protectorate status; the revolution that began on 23 July 1952 led to a republic being declared on 18 June 1953 and all British troops withdrawn on 18 June 1956); note - it was ca. 3200 BCE that the two lands of Upper (southern) and Lower (northern) Egypt were first united politically

 

National holiday:

Revolution day, 23 July (1952)

 

Constitution:

11 September 1971; amended 22 may 1980, 25 may 2005, and 26 march 2007; note - constitution dissolved by the military caretaker government 13 February 2011

 

Legal system:

Based on Islamic and civil law (particularly Napoleonic codes); judicial review by Supreme Court and council of state (oversees validity of administrative decisions); accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations

 

Suffrage:

18 years of age; universal and compulsory

 

Executive branch:

Chief of state: President (vacant); Vice President (vacant); note - following the resignation of President Mohamed Hosni Mubarak in February 2011, the supreme council of the armed forces, headed by defence minister Muhammad Hussein Tantawi, assumed control of the government

Head of government: Prime Minister Essam Abdel Aziz Sharaf (since 4 March 2011); Deputy Prime Minister Yehia El-Gamal (since 24 February 2011)

Cabinet: a new cabinet was sworn in on 7 March 2011

 

Elections: President elected by popular vote for a six-year term (no term limits)

Election results: Hosni Mubarak re-elected President; percent of vote - Hosni Mubarak 88.6%, Ayman Nour 7.6%, Noman Gomaa 2.9%

 

Legislative branch:

Bicameral system consists of the advisory council or Majlis Al-Shura (Shura Council) that traditionally functions mostly in a consultative role (264 seats; 176 members elected by popular vote, 88 appointed by the President; members serve six-year terms; mid-term elections for half of the elected members) and the people's assembly or Majlis Al-Sha'b (518 seats; 508 members elected by popular vote, 64 seats reserved for women, 10 appointed by the President; members serve five-year terms)

Elections: advisory council - last held in June 2010 (next to be held in 2013); people's assembly - last held in November-December 2010 in one round of voting and one run-off election (next to be held in 2015); note - on 13 February 2011 the ruling military council dissolved the parliament

Election results: advisory council - percent of vote by party - Na; seats by party - NDP 80, Al-Geel 1, Nasserist 1, NWP 1, Tagammu 1, Tomorrow Party 1, Independents 3; People's Assembly - percent of vote by party - Na; seats by party - NDP 419, NWP 6, Tagammu 5, Democratic Peace Party 1, Social Justice Party 1, Tomorrow Party 1, Independents 71, seats undecided 4, seats appointed by President 10

 

Judicial branch:

Supreme constitutional court

 

Political parties and leaders:

Al-Geel; Democratic Peace Party; Nasserist Party [Ahmed Hassan]; National Democratic Party or NDP (governing party) [Mohamed Hosni Mubarak]; National Progressive Unionist Grouping or Tagammu [Rifaat El-Said]; New WAFD Party or NWP [Sayed El-Bedawy]; Social Justice Party [Mohamed Abdel Al Hasan]; Tomorrow Party [Ayman Nour]

Note: formation of political parties must be approved by the government; only parties with representation in elected bodies are listed

 

Political pressure groups and leaders:

Muslim Brotherhood (technically illegal)

Note: despite a constitutional ban against religious-based parties and political activity, the technically illegal Muslim Brotherhood constitutes Egypt's most potentially significant political opposition; President Mubarak has alternated between tolerating limited political activity by the Brotherhood and blocking its influence (its members compete as independents in elections but do not currently hold any seats in the legislature); civic society groups are sanctioned, but constrained in practical terms; only trade unions and professional associations affiliated with the government are officially sanctioned; internet social networking groups and bloggers

 

International organization participation:

ABEDA, AFDB, AFESD, AMF, AU, BSEC (observer), CAEU, CICA, COMESA, D-8, EBRD, FAO, G-15, G-24, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICRM, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, IMSO, INTERPOL, IOC, IOM, IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, LAS, MIGA, MINURSO, MONUSCO, NAM, OAPEC, OAS (observer), OIC, OIF, OSCE (partner), PCA, UN, UNAMID, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNMIL, UNMIS, UNOCI, UNRWA, UNWTO, UPU, WCO, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO

 

Diplomatic representation in the US:

Chief of mission: Ambassador Sameh Hassan Shoukry

Chancery: 3521 International Court NW, Washington, DC 20008

Telephone: [1] (202) 895-5400

Fax: [1] (202) 244-4319

Consulate(s) General: Chicago, Houston, New York, San Francisco

 

Diplomatic representation from the US:

Chief of mission: Ambassador Margaret Scobey

Embassy: 8 Kamal El Din Salah St., Garden City, Cairo

Mailing address: Unit 64900, Box 15, Apo ae 09839-4900; 5 Tawfik Diab Street, Garden City, Cairo

Telephone: [20] (2) 2797-3300

Fax: [20] (2) 2797-3200

 

Flag description:

Three equal horizontal bands of red (top), white, and black; the national emblem (a gold eagle of Saladin facing the hoist side with a shield superimposed on its chest above a scroll bearing the name of the country in Arabic) centred in the white band; the band colours derive from the Arab liberation flag and represent oppression (black), overcome through bloody struggle (red), to be replaced by a bright future (white)

Note: similar to the flag of Syria, which has two green stars in the white band, Iraq, which has an Arabic inscription centred in the white band, and Yemen, which has a plain white band

 

National anthem:

Name: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" (my homeland, my homeland, my homeland)

Lyrics/music: Younis-Al Gadi/Sayed Darwish

Note: adopted 1979; after the signing of the 1979 peace with Israel, Egypt sought to create an anthem less militaristic than its previous one; Sayed Darwish, commonly considered the father of modern Egyptian music, composed the anthem

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