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Complete Guide  to Egypt travel & Tours
Complete Egypt

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Complete Egypt

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Complete guide to Egypt  travel & Tours

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TRANSPORTATION IN EGYPT

General Information

Egyptian Cities

Maps of Egypt

Egyptian history

Tour planner

Egypt vacations

Tour packages

Egypt Nile cruises

Travel news

FAQ

About Egypt

HOW TO GET THERE

Cairo International Airport is located to the north-east of the city and is the busiest airport in Egypt and the second busiest in Africa (behind OR Tambo International Airport in South Africa).

At least 65 different airlines use the airport, including charters, with 9 cargo airlines.

 

The largest operator is EgyptAir, which holds about 61% of the departure slots, which is not surprising as it is EgyptAir which connects Cairo to all of the other airports in Egypt providing the most popular way for tourists to get to their next destination. 16.1 million passengers passed through the airport in 2010, and it handled just under 154,832 aircraft movements.

 

There are three terminals, with the third, and the largest, opening in April 2009. One year later, in April 2010, terminal 2 was closed for major renovation works to its structure and facilities.

INTERESTING TIPS

If you are on prescribed medication, make sure you have enough for your trip; again you can get prescriptions filled in Egypt, so bring it/them with you.

Make up a mini-medikit with plasters, headache tablets, mosquito repellent, sun cream, safety pins etc.

 

Cairo

Alex

Luxor

Aswan

Hurg

Sharm

Ismai

Suez

Marsa Matruh

Port Said

Minya

Cairo

 

139

420

563

329

342

87

81

318

139

154

Alex

224

 

556

701

472

438

169

226

179

222

293

Luxor

676

895

 

139

186

644

489

503

736

556

241

Aswan

906

1128

223

 

319

861

648

649

879

701

407

Hurg

529

759

299

513

 

458

303

245

651

354

378

Sharm

550

705

1036

1386

737

 

268

213

617

352

454

Isma

140

272

785

1043

487

431

 

57

348

53

241

Suez

130

364

810

1044

395

342

91

 

405

108

241

Marsa Matrh

512

288

1185

1415

1047

993

560

652

 

401

472

Port Said

224

357

895

1128

569

566

85

174

645

 

293

Minya

248

472

387

655

608

730

387

388

760

472

 

DISTANCES BETWEEN MAJOR TOWNS IN EGYPT
The distances to the left are in Km, and the ones to the right are in miles
Cairo, which is the major hub of the railway network, also offers rail transport to either Port Said or Suez. Unfortunately, Suez is the closest point which railways go to the Sinai, so it is not possible to journey by rail to any of the resorts located there. This also applies to Hurghada, which also has no rail network.
Egypt has plenty of roads, approximately 38,000Km (23,600 miles) of them, which includes about 18,000Km (11,200 miles) of highways. Every city, town or village are connected by road, even the towns in the various oases; though many of these roads are more suitable for 4x4 vehicles. There are 5 highways which join Cairo with Alexandria (2 of them do this), Port Said, Suez and the Fayoum. Buses help connect all of the cities, towns and villages together, but many of the routes are either not advised, or not permitted, for tourism purposes; this especially applies to the Cairo to Luxor/Aswan route.
There are about 8600 Km (5300 miles) of railways in Egypt with the major one following the course of the River Nile from Aswan, in the south, to Marsa Matruh on the Mediterranean coast; a distance of 1415Km (879 miles). This route offers travellers the choice of seated and sleeper trains and it is one of the cheapest ways to get to the main tourist sites as Luxor, Cairo and Alexandria are 3 of the stations which it passes through. Because this line starts, or ends, in Aswan, anyone who wishes to travel onwards to Abu Simbel need to do so by road, using one of the 2 daily convoys, or flight.
The River Nile is fully navigable throughout its course, though restrictions on cruise boats have been in place since the mid 90’s; they only now sail between Luxor and Aswan. As well as this famous river there are over 1600Km of shipping canals in the country, with an additional 17,700Km (11,000 miles) if irrigation canals in the Delta, which are primarily used for transportation reasons.
When first opened, in 1869, the Suez Canal was 164Km (102 miles) long and 8 metres (26 feet) deep, but with major improvements it is now 193.25Km (120.42 miles) long and 24 metres (79 feet) deep. This improved distance comprises of: the northern access channel, 22Km (14 miles) long; the canal itself, 162.25Km (100.82 miles); and the southern access channel, 9Km (5.6 miles) long. The canal has no locks and seawater flows freely throughout its length. The Suez Canal, which was closed between 1967 and 1975, provides one of the major revenues for Egypt, the income being received from tolls for usage. The average transit time is 14 hours and in 2007, 18,193 vessels passed through it.
Flying from Cairo airport is the quickest, and most convenient, method to reach tourist destinations such as: Abu Simbel; Alexandria; Aswan; Hurghada; Luxor; Marsa Alam; Sharm el-Sheikh; and Taba, though many more towns and cities can be reached by domestic flights from Cairo.
Egypt’s major port is Alexandria, along with Port Said and Suez. They are all served by numerous shipping companies, though nowadays this is mainly a commercial operation. Though Mediterranean cruise ships still dock in Alexandria, allowing their passengers the opportunity to visit the city (or even Cairo) Egypt is no longer connected to other ports in the Mediterranean Sea due to the ongoing problems in Palestine and Israel.
In the deserts it is still possible to see the occasional camel caravan, but this mode of transport is disappearing quickly and you can only get a very limited sight of them.